Archive | March, 2012

Join the Room Debate

30 Mar

It’s Room Debate time again and this week it’s a modern Scandinavian living room up for discussion.

As always, it’s easy to take part. Just have a good look at the room photo below and leave a comment with your answers to these two questions:

One thing I like most about this room is…

One thing I like least about this room is…

{Stadshem}

I’ll kick off the discussion in the comments section… looking forward to chatting to you there.

Have a lovely weekend!

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You might also like these posts:

Add your views to the previous posts in the Room Debate series

The prettiest colour combo in the world ever… the sequel

28 Mar

Cavegirls can go gooey over pretty colours too, right?

{via Food & Cook / Carolina Prep / Martha Stewart}

I can’t get enough of sugarcoated mint and blush at the moment… wear it, cook it, decorate with it. This is what spring looks like to me this year!

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You might also like these posts:

Previously the prettiest colour combo in the world ever, coral and turquoise

The one where I bang on about yellow and grey. Oh and another one. And another

Live like a cavegirl

26 Mar

Despite the whole London thing, I’m a proper country bumpkin at heart. While the other girls were dressing up as princesses, I was usually happier playing cavemen with my brother, smearing my face with mud, running around barefoot and cooking up delicious ‘meals’ from plants and berries foraged from the garden.

Twenty years on, not much has changed really – when it comes to holidays you can forget sun loungers and piña coladas, I’d much rather be somewhere like this:

Urnatur Woodhermitage is a collection of magical little huts and treehouses in a wooded clearing in rural Sweden. Visitors are encouraged to get back to nature (and back to basics) with almost everything built, cooked or crafted from the immediate surroundings.

I’d find it impossible to choose which one to stay in – reading the descriptions of the Hat Cabin, the Charcoaler’s Hut and the Little Treehouse, each one sounds even lovelier than the last.

Aspiring cavemen (and women) are welcomed – there are courses about gathering wild herbs and mushrooms from the forest, simple carpentry, haymaking and the intriguing sounding ‘fire & knife’.

{all Ulrika Krynitz / Urnatur}

By now you’re probably either recoiling at the idea of staying in an unheated, electricity-free shed for a holiday, or desperate to know when you can go. If you’re amongst the latter, Urnatur is open from April to October and you can book via the website. If you’ve been captured by the magic, check out these photos and videos Anthropologie took when they visited Urnatur to shoot one of their look books a couple of years ago.

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A remote and rustic cabin in Croatia

A beautifully understated Moroccan Riad

N is for Napkins

23 Mar

“People mentioned in Debrett’s never speak of serviettes”

An oft-quoted nugget of wisdom from my Granny – she went to Swiss finishing school so when it comes to silly rhymes about manners, there’s no better source!

And that’s why these pretty pins come now rather than eight letters down the line…

N is for Napkins

{Tana Photography / Style Me Pretty via Pinterest}

{Dreamy Whites via Pinterest}

{Dana Gallagher / Sweet Paul via Pinterest}

{Nina Holst via Pinterest}

For daily inspiration, ideas and prettiness, don’t forget you can follow Decorator’s Notebook on Pinterest and on Twitter @DecoratorsNotes.

Bon weekend!

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You might also like these posts…

J is for Jam Jars

C is for Cutlery

Storage in yellow and grey

21 Mar

Three little words that make my eyes light up! Cast yours over these lovely ideas for a bright and organised hallway from Swedish mag, Drömhem & Trädgård.

1950s larders like this crop up all the time on eBay – I like them because they tend to be fairly narrow so are perfect for slotting into alcoves. Even the really tatty ones can be made over with a lick of paint,  new handles and a scrap of bright wallpaper on the back of the shelf. Personally I’d have used something a bit bolder here – the summery Cow Parsley by Cole & Son perhaps?

I’m fairly sure this display cubby is made from a PRÄNT plywood storage box from IKEA fixed to the wall by its base and lined with pretty paper. I have several of these boxes for my filing but hadn’t thought to use them like this.

{all Drömhem & Trädgård}

I’m a big fan of these wire storage baskets – in my dreams I’ll have a dedicated craft room with Kilner jars of colour-coded buttons and ribbons, and fabric swatches folded beautifully into baskets like these. A girl can but dream.

Decorator’s Notebook on Flickr

20 Mar

Just a quick stop by to let you know I’m now on Flickr – if you’re interested I’ve uploaded some ‘before’ and ‘after’ photos of Le Flat that you might not have seen before… plus a few extras I found while going through my laptop, like my living room moodboard.

{Decorator’s Notebook}

Are you on Flickr too? If you are let me know as I’m a bit lonely over there at the moment! Come and find me here.

Postman’s Park

19 Mar

Hidden just a stone’s throw from St Paul’s Cathedral and surrounded by investment banks is one of London’s secret sights. Postman’s Park is a green oasis on the site of a former burial ground and home to the George Frederic Watt’s Memorial to Heroic Self-sacrifice. A bit of a mouthful, the memorial is a collection of beautifully painted tiles commemorating ordinary people who died saving the lives of others.

The concise yet poetic language with which the heart-wrenching tales are told is really touching and strangely compelling. Some of the stories described could be from yesterday’s newspapers, while others are a historical snapshot of the hazards of living and working in Victorian London.

{all Decorator’s Notebook}

If you’re in the St Paul’s area with a few minutes to spare the memorial is definitely worth a visit. It’s one of those London sites that not many people know is there so feels extra special. Read more about Postman’s Park here and find it between Little Britain, Angel Street and King Edward St.

Do you have any favourite ‘secret’ London sights?

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You might also like these posts:

The time I went foraging for mushrooms on Wimbledon Common

Meet dinosaurs, pigs and a headless lady in Crystal Palace Park

Join the Room Debate!

16 Mar

Welcome all! I thought this fresh and springlike bedroom would be a good choice for today’s Room Debate – what do we think of this one?

As always, it’s easy to take part. Just have a good look at the room photo below and leave a comment with your answers to these two questions:

One thing I like most about this room is…

One thing I like least about this room is…

{via Desire to Inspire}

As usual, I’ll start things off in the comments below – looking forward to meeting you there!

Have a great weekend!

Ps: in case you’d like to add your thoughts to any of the previous Room Debate discussions, you’ll find the archive here.

Thinking outside the box-frame

14 Mar

This post was nearly titled The Ultimate Gallery Wall. Here’s why…

I decided against it because gallery wall hardly does justice to the part art installation, part anthropological collection, part collage in this extraordinary home. It belongs to Tokyo hairstylist Katsuya Kamo – I’ll hazard that you won’t find many hairdresser’s homes in the UK that look like this!

I’ve long been fascinated by old boxes of butterflies and insects… the one with the little white moths and ivory chess piece here has an eerie beauty about it. I love the box of heart-shaped pebbles too.

{all Todd Selby via The Selby}

Now I’ve been known to stick the odd random object in the odd RIBBA frame in my time (Penguin classics, stamps, old maps and paper butterflies to name but a few) but Katsuya Kamo’s collection is on another level altogether. It’s amazing to think of the memories hung up on this wall, not only about the origins of everything but where each item or frame was bought or found too.

You can explore the rest of the house courtesy of The Selby and if a cutting-edge Japanese hairdo is on your wish list, look no further than this.

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You might also like these posts:

Lovely black and white photos from my family archive

I really should get around to putting something great here

Spiders and bats and snails, oh my

12 Mar

Not the most likely motifs for a beautiful textile collection perhaps, but these creatures and more appear on the cushions, throws and shawls of Finnish design studio Klaus Haapaniemi. The patterns are drawn from Finnish folklore and the textiles are mostly made by hand using traditional methods, materials and dyes.

{all Klaus Haapeniemi}

Unsurprisingly, these handmade textiles don’t come cheap (the throw above is £395, the cushion, £70 and the silk scarf, £110) but if you can stretch you can order online. While you’re there, check out the charming screen prints too – the green owl is my favourite. Don’t be fooled by his whimsical expression… his talons tell a different story.

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