Tag Archives: craft project

Make a pretty floral wreath from wallpaper scraps

31 Mar

I loved creating my flower crown from garden blooms and blossoms last week but was a little sad to find it didn’t last more than a few hours. Today I came across this beautifully simple craft project by The House That Lars Built and thought my fellow floral craft fans might be keen to try it too!

It’s a great way to use up offcuts of wallpaper, which I always feel bad about throwing away. If you don’t have any that are right though, wallpaper shops will usually provide free samples – ask them to give you a piece large enough to show the whole repeat and it will probably be big enough to make this. The wallpaper used here is from Laura Ashley.

wreath-made-from-greenery-and-wallpaper

how to make a wreath from floral wallpaper scraps

make-a-wallpaper-wreath-with-laura-ashley

{Photographs Trisha Zemp | Project The House That Lars Built}

 

This simple paper wreath would look so pretty on a door or hanging above the bed in a guest bedroom. Find full instructions for how to make it at The House That Lars Built.

DIY: how to make a spring flower crown

20 Mar

How to make a spring flower crown - step by step at Decorator's Notebook

Celebrate spring by making a pretty flower crown - step by step at Decorator's Notebook blog

Flower crown DIY - Decorator's Notebook blog

Make a flower crown with wild flowers - Decorator's Notebook

Wildflower headpiece - tutorial at Decorator's Notebook blog

Simple garden flower crown - DIY - Decorator's Notebook blog

It all started with a Friday afternoon twitter chat. You know the sort: when everyone’s an hour or so away from pouring their first G&T and avoiding the last few tasks they should be finishing for the week.

The conversation turned to having pictures of ourselves on our blogs. If you’ve been reading for a while, you might know that I wrote Decorator’s Notebook anonymously for the first two years, without my name, let alone with a mug shot looking out top right. There was some discussion around how posting a ‘blogger’s selfie’ can feel like a horribly awkward and self-conscious thing to do. But for me, it was actually one of the most important moments for me and my blog. Until I ‘came out’ I didn’t realise how detached I’d felt from the blogging community and how much I’d been holding back for years. The second I posted a photo of myself and wrote a proper ‘about me’ was the moment Decorator’s Notebook actually felt like mine.

One of the blogger profile pictures I like best in all the world is Michelle’s – go and check it out and see how the idea for #primaveracrowns was born! So, here’s my contribution… a simple garland of flowers from my Mum’s garden to celebrate the start of spring. Is anyone joining us? You know what, it doesn’t really matter. Because this is me, wearing my crown, on my blog. And I’m proud and happy to be here.

How to make a spring flower crown from garden flowers - DIY - Decorator's Notebook blog

DIY - how to make a spring flower crown - step by step at Decorator's Notebook blog

HOW TO MAKE A SPRING FLOWER CROWN

1 | Gather your supplies: thick wire (the rubber coated sort used for garden ties works well), some thin beading wire, secateurs and a selection of freshly-cut flowers and foliage. I used rosemary, hellebores, cherry blossom, primroses and grape hyacinths.

2 | Twist the thick wire into a circle just a little larger than you want it to be once it’s on your head – the finished crown will fit a little more snuggly once it’s filled out with flowers.

3 | Start by covering the wire with foliage. Something quite dense that comes in long stems will make this easier. Tuck the end into one of the twists in your wire then gently wrap the stems around, securing it every now and then with beading wire.

4 | This is where you want to end up – an evenly covered base on which to build. Now the fun begins!

5 | Add your flowers, starting with the bigger ones. Hold the stems in place with one hand while you secure them with beading wire with the other. If you want to get all florist-y about it you could use special wire and tape (see how here) but I find my way a lot less faff! How you position the flowers is completely up to you… I went for even spacing all the way around but something asymetric can look wonderful too. Head to my flower crown inspiration board for lots of ideas.

6 | Once your big blooms are spaced as you’d like, add in the smaller ones using the same technique, filling any gappy bits as you go.

An important note: soft-stemmed wild or garden flowers like these don’t like being out of water for long, so you’ll need to make your crown soon before you want to wear it or it will look wilted and sad! For a longer-lasting flower crown, choose blooms with woody stems like roses and eucalyptus – these will last overnight if spritzed with water and stored in a plastic bag in the fridge.

If you’ve made a flower crown with Michelle and I, please post your photos to Twitter, Facebook or Instagram using #primaveracrowns and add your link below. We can’t wait to see them!


Spring flower crown DIY by Decorator's Notebook blog

{Photographs and tutorial all © Decorator’s Notebook – you are welcome to share but please do not re-post the entire tutorial and always link with love!}

15-minute make: autumn wreath DIY

21 Oct

Autumn is the most beautiful and intriguing time to live in the countryside. It’s when I get my strongest cavegirl tendencies and I love gathering nuts, berries and mushrooms to cook and preserve. Inspired by the return of Nature in the Home this week I decided to get crafty with my autumn gatherings (instead of eating them!) and make something pretty to bring indoors.

autumn wreath DIY

1) Start off by making a base for your wreath. I took advantage of the heap of prunings in the garden and grabbed a handful of spiraea but there’s no science to this and any slim, flexible stems will do. Take a small bunch in your hands and bend them round into a ring, twisting the stems together as you do. At the top of your circle, cross the tops over and wind the loose ends back around the ring to create a basic wreath. Tuck in any escaped twigs. I left on some of the fresh leaves but snip them off if you want a longer-lasting decoration.

how to make a wreath at home

2) Get out and about and gather up some interesting autumn bits to decorate your wreath. Even if you live in the city you should be able to collect plenty of colourful leaves, pinecones and feathers in your local park.

autumn collection of natural objects

3) It’s completely freestyle from now on! The basic wreath can be adapted using whatever natural ingredients you can find. I set out to try and make this wreath with only natural elements (no wire or glue) as I always find it inhibitive to have to assemble materials before I get started. Instead, use the twisted stems of you wreath to weave in the decorations – there should be spots all around where you can tuck them in tightly.

fall wreath DIY

{Project and photos all Decorator’s Notebook blog}

That’s it! The best thing about this project is that each and every wreath is going to be different and the basic idea will work just as well in other seasons. Make your own Christmas wreath for the holidays by adding fircones, evergreen foliage and red berries or an easter wreath with lots of feathers and blossom. Mine hasn’t completely dried out yet, but I can’t see any reason why the twiggy wreath base wouldn’t last and be reusable again and again.

15-minute make: graphic painted tablecloth

7 Jun

If you can paint a straight line, you can paint this tablecloth. Now that’s my kind of DIY!

graphic-pattern-painted-tablec{Photograph and project adapted from Tina Fussell for A Subtle Revelry}

Graphic painted tablecloth

Cotton tablecloth or flat sheet, washed without fabric softener and dried

Black fabric paint (eg: Dylon)

Paintbrush

Iron

1) Iron the tablecloth, lay down on the floor (protect the floor with a waterproof dust sheet) and hold down at the corners with masking tape. You can paint the pattern freehand, but if you feel nervous mark out a grid with masking tape.

2) Paint on the crosses. Make them as big, small, regular or irregular as you like. Arrows or dots would also work well.

3) When the paint is dry, iron the tablecloth on the reverse to fix the paint (or follow the fixing instructions on your fabric paint pack).

4) Top with cakes and admire!

For more step-by-step photographs of see the full project at A Subtle Revelry

15-minute make: twiggy plant markers

25 Jan

DIY herb makers made from twigs

Here’s a lemon squeezy little craft project for you to try out over the weekend. Spring is just around the corner so I’ll be adding a few green-fingered ideas over the coming months in celebration (anticipation).

Twig Plant Markers

Twigs about 20cm long and a little thicker than a pencil

Sharp craft knife and cutting mat

Alphabet stamps

Coloured ink pads or acrylic paint

1) Whittle one end of each stick into a point. At the other end, slice away the bark on one side of each twig, exposing about 6cm of the wood beneath.

2) Dab your alphabet stamps into the ink or paint being careful not to load the stamp too heavily. Stamp your chosen plant names onto the bare wood.

3) Leave to dry the pop into the pots. Standard craft ink isn’t waterproof so remove the markers before watering!

stick plant markers DIY

{both via Etsy}

Sweetly reminiscent, something mother used to bake

19 Jul

I love how a particular recipe can remind you of a particular person. My Great Nanny Bessie’s Welsh Cakes, Granny’s Lemonade and my Nanny’s Coffee Kisses have worked their way into my own repertoire and I think of them every time I prepare them. I’ve often thought how lovely it would be to compile all the signature dishes in my family and make a recipe book. It’s one of many good ideas I’ve never got around to!

When Emma Jeffery’s grandmother passed away she found three scraps of yellowing notepaper containing handwritten recipes. They were the only examples of her grandmother’s writing that survived and she came up with the sweet idea of printing them onto tea towels. As soon as I saw this tutorial I felt instantly inspired to get my family recipe project back on track and try making some of these myself to give as presents.

{all Emma Jeffrey via Spoonflower}

Emma’s provided a full step-by-step tutorial over at Spoonflower so I won’t copy it all out here – go and check it out. Even if you don’t have original written recipes you could always copy out some family favourites in your best handwriting and start from there.  Poems, stories or would work well too.

S is for Snail Mail

15 Jun

When I was growing up, I had several pen friends and I think it’s a shame that children today are pretty unlikely to exchange letters with a friend overseas or from an old school. A text message, email or BBM just doesn’t have the excitement of a hand-decorated envelope with foreign stamps dropping through the letterbox, containing answers to questions asked weeks ago on pastel-coloured notepaper.

Aside from birthday cards and thank-you notes, I hardly ever write letters for fun anymore. Collecting the inspiring pins for today’s Pinterest A-Z reminds me how lovely it is receive something other than boring window envelopes in the post. And that’s why…

S is for Snail Mail

{Camilla Engman via my Pinterest boards}

{Hooray via my Pinterest boards}

{100 Layer Cake via my Pinterest boards}

{Creature Comforts via my Pinterest boards}

{via Sallies via my Pinterest boards}

{Sweet Paul via my Pinterest boards}

If you’ve been inspired to try making your own envelopes I think this DIY envelope tutorial at Poppytalk is the best – save different shapes and sizes when it’s your birthday and build up a stock of templates.

Come and follow Decorator’s Notebook on Pinterest for daily snippets from the world of interiors, crafting and general loveliness!

The Fabulous Scavenger

11 Jun

It’s been a while since I shared a blog crush, but two lovely posts about Decorator’s Notebook this week at Tea For Joy and Furnish reminded me how nice it is to celebrate fellow bloggers.

The Fabulous Scavenger has only been going for a few months but it’s already full of clever projects for upcycling vintage finds. Ok, I admit that my praise is tinged with envy… just look at these amazing children’s chairs writer Samantha found on the side of the road and this beautifully battered spirit level from a charity shop. Some people just seem to have all the luck!

Anyway, let’s find it in our hearts to be pleased for her and look at some of Samantha’s brilliant projects.

I was really intrigued to read about what Samantha calls ‘the hard rubbish collection’ – a designated day where households can put junk outside their homes for the council (or whatever they call bin men across the pond) to pick up. Apparently scrap metal collectors and keen vintage hunters cruise the streets in the hope of beating the official rubbish truck and picking up some treasure for themselves. These little spice jars were rescued from the roadside and after a quick wash they make lovely mini vases.

This spirit level wall hook DIY couldn’t be simpler – just screw one to the other and voilà! Such a clever yet straightforward idea.

{all The Fabulous Scavenger}

There’s so much I love about this bedroom: the headboard made from old mirror frames, those adorable children’s chairs at the end of the bed and the easy lamp update using a colourful scarf. Further proof (if we ever needed it) that a little splash of yellow improves almost any room.

With so many great ideas to share so soon after starting blogging, I’ll definitely be keeping a close eye on The Fabulous Scavenger from now on. Go and check it out… I think you’ll agree!

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